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EBCOG position statement on violence against women

Published:February 03, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2017.01.059
      Violence against women is a major public health problem as well as being a violation of women’s human rights [

      WHO, Violence against women. Intimate partner and sexual violence against women, Fact sheet No 239, Updated 2016. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs239/en/.

      ]. The United Nations defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in physical, sexual or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life”. In the family, it includes battering, sexual abuse of female children, dowry-related violence, marital rape, female genital mutilation, and violence related to exploitation. Within the community it includes rape, sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation in the workplace, as well as trafficking of women, forced prostitution and violence perpetrated or condoned by the State [

      United Nations Declaration on the elimination of violence against women, 1993. Available at: http://www.un.org/documents/ga/res/48/a48r104.htm.

      ].
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      References

      1. WHO, Violence against women. Intimate partner and sexual violence against women, Fact sheet No 239, Updated 2016. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs239/en/.

      2. United Nations Declaration on the elimination of violence against women, 1993. Available at: http://www.un.org/documents/ga/res/48/a48r104.htm.

      3. Violence against women: an EU-wide survey, Main results EUROPEAN UNION AGENCY FOR FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS (FRA), 2014. Available at: http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra-2014-vaw-survey-main-results-apr14_en.pdf.

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