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The use of cold cots following perinatal death

  • Eleanor R. Jones
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Obstetrics, St Mary’s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL, United Kingdom.
    Affiliations
    St. Mary's Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom
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  • Victoria Holmes
    Affiliations
    Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biological, Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
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  • Alexander E.P. Heazell
    Affiliations
    St. Mary's Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom

    Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biological, Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
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      Recently it was reported that a couple had used a cooling cot to care for their dead baby girl for 16 days (12 in a hospice and 4 days at home) prior to her funeral [ ]. The family felt this prolonged the amount of time they could spend with their baby which helped their grieving process.
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      References

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